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Portfolio


Not your typical Wall Street Family Office…

Because we’re first generation and we’ve actually run our own businesses,

had to make payroll, started with nothing, and turned it into

thousands of jobs and billions in enterprise value.

Allocating more resources than ever, Clarke Capital Partners invests in best-of-breed

operators who lead their businesses to

real profitability while following their own high-growth path.

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Portfolio


Not your typical Wall Street Family Office…

Because we’re first generation and we’ve actually run our own businesses,

had to make payroll, started with nothing, and turned it into

thousands of jobs and billions in enterprise value.

Allocating more resources than ever, Clarke Capital Partners invests in best-of-breed

operators who lead their businesses to

real profitability while following their own high-growth path.

Current Portfolio

Realized investments

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Causes


For centuries, the Latin phrase Labore et Honore -- which translates to "Labor and Honor" -- has adorned the Clarke Family Coat of Arms. As a young boy raised amidst Idaho potato farms, Clarke gained practical meaning from the phrase as he collected his weekly paycheck while working summers for his parents.

Far more important than the sum of money at the end of each week were the words on his paycheck. Had he been honorable and hardworking in his efforts, the memo section of the paycheck would read "LABOR and HONOR."

Had he just worked, but been late or given a half-hearted effort, the memo section of the check would simply read "LABOR," a singular word which made his young heart sink. Clarke learned early that only labor and honor together would suffice in all of his efforts.

Causes


For centuries, the Latin phrase Labore et Honore -- which translates to "Labor and Honor" -- has adorned the Clarke Family Coat of Arms. As a young boy raised amidst Idaho potato farms, Clarke gained practical meaning from the phrase as he collected his weekly paycheck while working summers for his parents.

Far more important than the sum of money at the end of each week were the words on his paycheck. Had he been honorable and hardworking in his efforts, the memo section of the paycheck would read "LABOR and HONOR."

Had he just worked, but been late or given a half-hearted effort, the memo section of the check would simply read "LABOR," a singular word which made his young heart sink. Clarke learned early that only labor and honor together would suffice in all of his efforts.

Causes & Boards